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10 Comments

  1. Emily Brown

    Thanks for writing such a great information and and sharing a great knowledge with newbies and patients like us.

    Reply
    • Adrian Zacher

      Emily you are most welcome. Thanks for commenting.

      Reply
  2. Dulce

    Good article and helpful information. Nice to find out that the dentist is the specialist to go to (my general and ENT doctors couldn’t help). Thank you.

    I do wonder about the affordability of a custom made MAD (device and visits to the dentist), and assume it will be a four digits affair…

    Reply
    • Adrian Zacher

      Hi Dulce. Thanks for your comment and praise. I’m glad it helped you understand more about the role of the sleep-trained dentist.

      Of course, I don’t know your currency – so if you’re in the UK I think you may be able to get a custom-made MRD and dental fees under 1000 GBP (proximity to London is the main variable here).

      Reply
  3. Sharon Turnoy

    Hi Adrian,

    A well-written, thorough coverage of the solutions out there.

    Sharon Turnoy

    Reply
    • Adrian Zacher

      Thank you Sharon. Kind of you to comment!

      Reply
  4. Liza

    The real question should be as to WHY is there no mention of TSD’s! They can be the healthiest and certainly the cheapest dental solution for a snorer (even with mild apnea diagnosis) AND they DO NO HARM to try! I suspect BIG PHARMA figures in this assessment somewhere.

    Reply
    • Adrian Zacher

      Hi Liza. Thanks for commenting. You are correct in that I made no mention of tongue retaining/stabilising devices (TRD/TSD) and I shall consider updating this article to rectify that omission. I would agree that custom-made, prescription TRD/TSDs may have a limited role when the patient has no teeth or there are jaw joint issues. However, they may be poorly tolerated and there is essentially less clinical evidence (compared to mandibular advancement devices) to support their role. See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3899326/#B11

      I would disagree wholeheartedly with your assertion that ‘they do no harm to try‘. Self-diagnosis of ‘snoring’ and then ‘treating’ yourself with anything is not very clever. Snoring may be a symptom of sleep apnoea and untreated sleep apnoea is a cause of considerable morbidity, reduction in quality of life, increase in healthcare utilisation and a cause of premature death.

      As to the involvement of, as you put it ‘big pharma’, my bank balance says otherwise! More seriously, there are no sponsors, advertisers or ‘powered by’ behind Snorer.com or myself. I have no interests to declare.

      Reply
  5. Paul Sharville

    This is a great article, well written and genuinely helpful amid a sea of supposed independent articles elsewhere on the web that are, in fact, merely a route to the sale of a product or service. Snoring is a tough gig for those who suffer from it (and beside it). You take the subject very seriously, you know what you’re talking about and you present a cogent, informed view to help sufferers make the right decisions for them. I’m a CPAP user and as effective as it is, going to bed looking like a Spitfire pilot every night is not great, and something that I’ve never quite got used to, so I’m always looking for cheaper, simpler, and let’s face it, more attractive, solutions for my sleep apnea. This is a great site from which to begin – and possibly end – your research into a better life as a sufferer. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Adrian K Zacher

      Paul. Thank you, for your kind words. I wish you every success in your quest. Here to help you.

      Reply

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